POPE FRANCIS MISTAKENLY DECLARES CHRISTIAN FUNDAMENTALISTS “A SCOURGE”

The Pope considers millions upon millions of Christians to be a plague that is infecting our planet… Wrong! the scourge is coming from the Middle East. Why couldn’t Pope Francis figure that out and attack the real, true enemies of Christianity instead of going after fellow Christians?

Ostensibly, his remarks apply to fundamentalists from all religions.  But by mentioning Argentina, the Pope made it exceedingly clear who his real target was.

There aren’t any “Muslim fundamentalists” or “Hindu fundamentalists” in Argentina.  The fundamentalists that he was referring to are the Christian fundamentalists in Argentina, and in the very next sentence he denounced such people as “a scourge”. He’s completly wrong.

Look at France where religious differences have caused Christian deaths, suffering, physical ruin and are driving the white French natives into the Atlantic Ocean according to Guillame Faye’s book “Ethnic Apocalypse” which had to be re-named to that from it’s original title: “Guerre Civile Raciale” which in English is:  “Racial Civil War”.  The Pople either disbelieves it or is ignoring it.

The Pope needs to get “Woke”. He needs lessons from president Trump about the dangers from the people in Iran, Libya, Somalia, Syria and Yemen from which Trump banned immigration thus protecting America for at least the short term… But this race-based religious war goes back in a continuous line to the year 610 AD, one thousand four hundred and nine (1,409) years ago.

The Pope needs to correctly identify the enemies to those who practice the religion for which the Pope is the temporal leader. There’s no way to win fighting  the wrong enemy. There were reasons previous Popes raised armies and sent them to the Middle East and it’s wasn’t to broaden their experiences with travel. It was to fight against the enemies of Christendom there.

In the last book he completed before his death, the irrepressible and trenchant Guillaume Faye took a bold and ruthlessly candid look at the increasingly volatile situation on the ground in Europe and it’s cause.

With the growing incidence of Islamicist terrorism and inter-religious violence on European soil, alongside the first signs of native resistance to the demographic changes which have made this violence possible, Faye compellingly argues Europe is poised for a terrible new civil war, threatening to break out along the many ethnic faultlines which have arisen thanks to years of bad immigration policies and bad political will.

Using some of the most troubling developments in French politics, culture and society as his arguments, Faye throws off the blinders of political correctness and confronts his readers with the harsh reality of an unsettled and deeply divisive multicultural Europe. Ethnic Apocalypse is a wake-up call aimed at making Europeans aware of their increasingly dire situation — before it is too late.

In 1938, Hilaire Belloc predicted “that there would be a resurrection of Islam and that our sons or our grandsons would see the renewal of that tremendous struggle between the Christian culture and what has been for more than a thousand years its greatest opponent.” Only eighty years later, Guillaume Faye’s last work, Ethnic Apocalypse, shows Belloc’s calamitous prophecy  came true. Ethnic Apocalypse, with poignant wit and fast-paced prose, sets the stage for a bloody civil war between the African-Oriental Muslims (and their French collaborators) and the white, French populace.

Non-French readers have likely heard of :the Bataclan massacre; the beheading of a priest in Normandy, the murder of Theo van Gogh and other violent assaults by Muslims in France and Europe, but Faye delves further into the rolling conflict that does not break into international news. Faye cites the frequent attacks in France on police officers, medical personnel, and firefighters, both on and off duty, by Muslim and African immigrants (invaders).

These attacks on representatives of the French nation are followed by “generally delinquent, criminal, hostile, provocative and parasitic behavior of a large part of these populations.”

Faye views this behavior as a greater threat than the terrorist attacks; the great danger to France is the steady creep of Islam dominated neighborhoods, riots, harassment of women, etc. which demoralizes the French populace and diminishes their culture.

Faye views only three possible outcomes for France (and the West in general): a refusal to fight and submission to the Islamic invaders (in the words of T.S. Eliot: “This is the way the world ends /
Not with a bang but with a whimper.”), a civil war ending in European defeat, or a civil war ending in European victory and a realignment of political thought. Faye rules out peaceful cohabitation and multiculturalism as a myth. He also scoffs at the thought of the French government and European Union suddenly changing their stance on immigration and multiculturalism and sending back the invaders.

Ethnic Apocalypse paints a bleak portrait of the future of France, and with France serving as a microcosm of the West, a miserable future for the West. Just as many ideas have sprouted from the French soil and then been transplanted throughout Europe, so will a racial civil war erupt in France and then spread throughout Europe.

This civil war will be as bloody or bloodier than the European Wars of Religion and have “far more devastating consequences” than the World Wars and the communist occupation of Russia. But while dark clouds hang over Europe, there is still a glimmer of hope if the people of Europe awake from their fear and complacency and assert themselves again as a racial, ethnic, cultural, and national people.

The reader who has not read Faye’s previous works and is unfamiliar with French politics need not fear picking up Faye’s brilliant book. It stands alone as a marvelous work, laying out the current situation in France and its solution, without needing a foundation in Faye’s earlier books. Additionally, the translator, Roger Adwan, has added excellent footnotes which explain references to French newspapers, politicians, and philosophers.