Michelle Obama opposes all-white and all-black schools. She’s not alone.

Michelle wants every school to reflect every race. Diversity and Multiculturalism.

South Africa enforced Apartheid. There was never, ever any type of apartheid in America. Never, never.

In America it became the law that no one can be separated from anyone who is different. How do we determine who is different? By identifying their race but race cannot be used according to Brown v. Topeka Board of Education.

Is Michelle’s world possible?

Yes, Brown v Board of Education made it illegal for schools to act on the basis of different races so the law enforcement part of the government will force people to integrate the public schools but for people who can make a choice it can’t be enforced.

What would Michelle’s Un-segregated Dream World look like?

The people must be forced to conform to the idea that racial differences are forbidden in the culture. Brown only prohibited race based choices in Government Schools.

Brown v. Board of Education led to bussing white and black kids out of their segregated neighborhoods into public schools that had too many white or black children.  

Race is a larger part of America than it is in other countries and cultures. Segregation by race is not an issue in Nigeria, for example.

Race must be used to satisfy Brown.

For Segregation to work the race of each individual must be known. Segregation requires one’s race be identified so government can put individuals where they belong in a government school. That’s what Brown v BOE did.

Brown required the use of race to eliminate the differences due to race. Huh?

The U.S. Supreme Court Ruled: “In the field of public education, the doctrine of ‘separate but equal’ has no place. Separate educational facilities are inherently unequal.”

Notwithstanding the narrowness of the ruling;- it only applied to public schools; it was known in 1954 that most cultures prefer to live with their own culture.  Brown certainly upset that.

on its head. The neighborhood school concept, with the pride and solidarity it engenders in a community, has been badly damaged for the last three decades.”

“In a move widely seen as the end of an era, Boston school officials have decided that this coming school year will be the last in which they use race as a factor in determining where students go to school.

  Fifteen years ago, in 1999 Boston school officials ruled the end of Brown ordered bussing. “Facing pressure from a lawsuit by white parents and advocates of neighborhood schools, the city’s school board voted 5-2 last month to adopt a race-blind admissions policy starting in September 2000.”

Garrity’s folly – 25 years after busing began, by Jeff Jacoby, 01-04-99 (dead link)

          ” ‘We came up with certain solutions, and – damn, it was working quite well, really.’ – Federal Judge Arthur Garrity Jr., author of Boston’s racial busing plan, in a recent interview.

          “He would win, hands down, any contest for the Most Hated Bostonian of the last 30 years. And deservedly so. For Judge Garrity did more than inflict on Boston’s schools and families a nightmare of riots, fear, racial hatred, and civic trauma. He did it with such blithe indifference to the pain of those he was hurting, such cool disdain for anyone who doubted the wisdom of accomplishing integration through massive crosstown busing, that to this day he still insists, ”Damn, it was working quite well, really.’

          “This June will mark the 25th anniversary of Garrity’s order to forcibly achieve racial balance in Boston’s public schools, an order that convulsed the city and triggered the most violent and notorious antibusing backlash in the nation. Images from the riots of 1974 still sear. Stanley Forman won the Pulitzer Prize with his unforgettable photograph of a black man being rammed with an American flag outside Boston City Hall.

          ” ‘The plan that Garrity imposed upon the city was punitive in the extreme,’ write Stephan and Abigail Thernstrom in ”America in Black and White,” their essential 1997 book on race relations. ‘Indeed, the judge’s advisers and the state Board of Education believed that those against whom it was directed – in their eyes, localist, uneducated, and bigoted – deserved to be punished. The plan thus paired Roxbury High, in the heart of the ghetto, with South Boston High, in the toughest, most insular, working-class section of the city. Blacks bused in from Roxbury would make up half of the sophomore class at South Boston High, while the whole junior class from `Southie’ would be shipped off to Roxbury High.’ ” (Boston Globe 01-04-99, page A15)

Busing’s legacy:  racial isolation by Jeff Jacoby 01-07-99 (dead link)           “On the Tuesday before Christmas, Billy Niedzwiecki was jumped by three schoolmates in a bathroom at South Boston High School. They stomped on him, broke his glasses, ripped a gold chain from his neck, and stabbed him five times. So severe was the attack that Billy had to undergo surgery twice at Boston Medical Center.

          “Police were quick to deny that race played a role in the stabbing – even though Billy, a South Boston native, is white and his attackers, who come from other neighborhoods, are black. Maybe the police are right, but no one would be surprised to learn otherwise. South Boston High has simmered with violence and racial uneasiness ever since 1974, when Judge W. Arthur Garrity ordered the School Department to forcibly intermingle black kids from Roxbury and white kids from South Boston. Busing put public schools like Southie High under a sort of martial law, with hundreds of state troopers patrolling the corridors, snipers posted on the roof, and metal detectors at the doors.

          “In the quarter-century since busing began, South Boston High School has erupted several times in racial brawls. In 1993, hundreds of students, black and white, hurled rocks, punches, and racist slurs at one another. Five people ended up in the hospital, including two police officers and the mayor. To this day, police still patrol the grounds of South Boston High. There are still metal detectors at the entrance. Judge Garrity’s legacy endures.”  (Boston Globe, 01-07-99, page A13)

The Supreme Court forced integration of government schools Is over. It didn’t last 50 years. In a few words, the results of the School Bussing Programs are over. School Bussing to fix segregation didn’t work. People of similar races like similar people.

But “Race” has been eliminated from the United Nations Lexicon. They use: “ethnic enumeration”.

Michelle used race when she married Barack. Would she consider her mixed race marriage a segregated marriage? If so, was that increasing segregation? 

Michelle uses racial identifications to celebrate Barack’s white grandparents who raised their bi-racial grandson who went on to marry a black woman and have bi-racial children.

Michelle didn’t say this but we need to get past race.

See Michelle’s comments HERE.

On May 17, 1954, the Supreme Court ruled: “In the field of public education, the doctrine of `separate but equal’ has no place. Separate educational facilities are inherently unequal.” In the aftermath of that ruling, scores of cities and towns implemented desegregation plans that often included mandatory busing, in some cases triggering an exodus of whites to private schools or less diverse communities.

John Rury, an education professor at the University of Kansas, said the work at UCLA has revealed how many of the advances in desegregating schools made after the Brown ruling have stopped – or been reversed.

While racial discrimination has been a factor, other forces are in play, Rury said. Educated parents with the means to move have flocked to districts and schools with the best reputations for decades, said Rury, who has studied the phenomenon in the Kansas City region.

In the South, many school districts encompass both a city and the surrounding area, he said. That has led to better-integrated schools.

Still, around the country, only 23 percent of black students attended white-majority schools in 2011. That’s the lowest number since 1968.
Read more at http://patdollard.com/2014/05/natural-segregation-shaping-composition-of-schools-effects-of-forced-integration-reversed/#50qgKQMVZStTz4C6.99

On May 17, 1954, the Supreme Court ruled: “In the field of public education, the doctrine of `separate but equal’ has no place. Separate educational facilities are inherently unequal.” In the aftermath of that ruling, scores of cities and towns implemented desegregation plans that often included mandatory busing, in some cases triggering an exodus of whites to private schools or less diverse communities.

John Rury, an education professor at the University of Kansas, said the work at UCLA has revealed how many of the advances in desegregating schools made after the Brown ruling have stopped – or been reversed.

While racial discrimination has been a factor, other forces are in play, Rury said. Educated parents with the means to move have flocked to districts and schools with the best reputations for decades, said Rury, who has studied the phenomenon in the Kansas City region.
Read more at http://patdollard.com/2014/05/natural-segregation-shaping-composition-of-schools-effects-of-forced-integration-reversed/#50qgKQMVZStTz4C6.99

On May 17, 1954, the Supreme Court ruled: “In the field of public education, the doctrine of `separate but equal’ has no place. Separate educational facilities are inherently unequal.” In the aftermath of that ruling, scores of cities and towns implemented desegregation plans that often included mandatory busing, in some cases triggering an exodus of whites to private schools or less diverse communities.

John Rury, an education professor at the University of Kansas, said the work at UCLA has revealed how many of the advances in desegregating schools made after the Brown ruling have stopped – or been reversed.

While racial discrimination has been a factor, other forces are in play, Rury said. Educated parents with the means to move have flocked to districts and schools with the best reputations for decades, said Rury, who has studied the phenomenon in the Kansas City region.
Read more at http://patdollard.com/2014/05/natural-segregation-shaping-composition-of-schools-effects-of-forced-integration-reversed/#50qgKQMVZStTz4C6.99

On May 17, 1954, the Supreme Court ruled: “In the field of public education, the doctrine of `separate but equal’ has no place. Separate educational facilities are inherently unequal.” In the aftermath of that ruling, scores of cities and towns implemented desegregation plans that often included mandatory busing, in some cases triggering an exodus of whites to private schools or less diverse communities.

John Rury, an education professor at the University of Kansas, said the work at UCLA has revealed how many of the advances in desegregating schools made after the Brown ruling have stopped – or been reversed.

While racial discrimination has been a factor, other forces are in play, Rury said. Educated parents with the means to move have flocked to districts and schools with the best reputations for decades, said Rury, who has studied the phenomenon in the Kansas City region.

In the South, many school districts encompass both a city and the surrounding area, he said. That has led to better-integrated schools.

Still, around the country, only 23 percent of black students attended white-majority schools in 2011. That’s the lowest number since 1968.
Read more at http://patdollard.com/2014/05/natural-segregation-shaping-composition-of-schools-effects-of-forced-integration-reversed/#50qgKQMVZStTz4C6.99

 

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