Jun 082018
 

For mentioning ethnicity’s connection to crime, Charleton Heston was trashed in the press as a racist but everybody knows Heston was telling the truth

In crime statistics, Hispanics are often lumped in with non-Hispanic whites. This has the effect of narrowing the gap between the black and white crime rates by inflating the white rate. It also obscures the relatively high rate of Hispanic crime.

Bureaucrats are normally very scrupulous about breaking out data by Hispanic ethnicity. It’s impossible to avoid the conclusion that this is done to make diversity in general, and current immigration in particular, look better. Nationally, blacks are imprisoned on average 9.1 times as often as whites. Hispanics are on average 3.7 times as likely as whites to be imprisoned.

We’ve taken a look at white homicide rates by state. Now let’s give black rates a gander. Using an online database out of the University of Michigan that utilizes the familiar SDA interface to pull figures from the Uniform Crime Reporting Data Series’ homicide reports from 2009, 2007, 2006, 2005, and 2003 is how we’ll go about it.

Murder rates among the total population are a lot easier to determine definitively than murder rates by subgroups within a population are. Murder is unlikely to go unreported–a corpse usually provides pretty good evidence of a homicide if it occurred. Take the number of murders by the overall population over a year and, voila, we have the homicide rate. However, the perpetrator(s) is sometimes unknown. Consequently, the sum rates of any number of non-overlapping subgroups is always going to fall short of the rate for the total population, even if the entire population falls into one of the various non-overlapping subgroups being considered.Estimated black murder rates during the aughts per 100,000 blacks, by state:

State

Rate

1. District of Columbia

38.68

2. Pennsylvania

34.16

3. Wisconsin

30.93

4. Michigan

30.89

5. Indiana

30.74

6. Arizona

29.90

7. Louisiana

29.28

8. Nevada

27.71

9. Oklahoma

27.06

10. Missouri

27.01

11. Tennessee

25.20

12. California

25.13

13. Kansas

24.10

14. Maryland

23.73

15. Arkansas

22.79

16. Ohio

22.34

17. Minnesota

21.58

18. Vermont*

21.24

19. West Virginia

19.70

20. Alabama

19.61

21. Illinois

18.62

22. New Jersey

18.19

23. Texas

18.00

24. Colorado

17.89

25. South Carolina

16.64

26. Virginia

16.26

27. Kentucky

16.16

28. New Mexico

16.00

29. North Carolina

15.40

30. Alaska*

15.39

31. Utah*

15.02

32. New York

14.76

33. Washington

14.53

34. Iowa

14.29

35. Delaware

14.00

36. Oregon

13.94

37. Georgia

13.54

38. Massachusetts

13.45

39. Wyoming*

12.57

40. Rhode Island*

11.77

41. Mississippi

11.20

42. Connecticut

10.57

43. Hawaii*

9.14

44. Montana*

8.78

45. South Dakota*

8.69

46. North Dakota*

8.41

47. Idaho*

8.28

48. Maine*

4.42

49. Nebraska*

3.68

50. New Hampshire*

2.23

 The above was taken from HERE. What does all that mean? That’s up to you to figure out. I can’t.